Academic Catalog

NCEL 403B: TRANSITIONING TO COLLEGE ESL PART II

Foothill College Course Outline of Record

Foothill College Course Outline of Record
Heading Value
Units: 0
Hours: 3 lecture per week (36 total per quarter)
Degree & Credit Status: Non-Degree-Applicable Non-Credit Course
Basic Skills, 4 Levels Below Transfer
Foothill GE: Non-GE
Transferable: None
Grade Type: Non-Credit Course (Receives no Grade)
Repeatability: Unlimited Repeatability

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to identify and apply different reading strategies to increase speed and comprehension.
  • Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to define and practice critical thinking skills
  • Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to use a dictionary.
  • Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to differentiate between part of a word to "de-code" new vocabulary.
  • Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to identify and practice writing different types of papers.

Description

Assists the adult English-learner to navigate the community college campus and requirements for successful studies, and prepares ESL students for successful transition to credit college-level coursework. Primary focus will be on reading and writing skills needed in and outside the classroom for academic success.

Course Objectives

The student will be able to:
A. identify and apply different reading strategies to increase speed and comprehension
B. define and develop critical thinking skills
C. use an American English learner’s dictionary
D. deconstruct new words into parts to "de-code" new vocabulary
E. identify and create different types of (short) academic writing

Course Content

A. Identify and apply different reading strategies to increase speed and comprehension
1. Strategies
a. Skimming
b. Scanning
c. Identify the main idea, purpose, and audience
d. Annotating
1) Highlighting, underlining, or circling key information
2) Summarizing sections of readings in short phrases
3) Using timelines to understand sequence and dates
4) Writing synonyms or definitions of difficult vocabulary in margins
B. Define and develop critical thinking skills
1. Identify different types of support, e.g., examples, facts, anecdote, etc.
2. Analyze and/or evaluate evidence presented in readings
3. Ask questions about the origins of an opinion or theory
4. Recognize bias
C. Use an American English learner’s dictionary
1. Online
2. In print
D. Deconstruct new words into parts to "de-code" new vocabulary
1. Utilize knowledge of roots, prefixes, and suffixes to decode new vocabulary and jargon
2. Recognize word families, e.g., analyze/analysis/analytical
E. Identify and create different types of (short) academic writing
1. Note-taking
2. Basic summarizing
a. Paraphrasing
3. Different types of writings
a. Descriptive
b. Narrative
c. Opinion/argumentative
4. Edit writing
a. Edit for correctness
b. Subject-verb agreement
c. Tense
d. Word form
e. Word choice
f. Punctuation

Lab Content

Not applicable.

Special Facilities and/or Equipment

Internet access.

Method(s) of Evaluation

A. group and class discussions
B. writing tasks
C. comprehension activities

Method(s) of Instruction

A. Lecture
B. Discussion
C. Cooperative learning experiences
D. Oral presentation
E. In-class work

Representative Text(s) and Other Materials

No text will be required. Websites such as the following will be used:

A. Developing Reading Skills (The National Capital Language Resource Center, Washington, DC)--for instructors teaching reading, but interesting for students to read): www.nclrc.org/essentials/reading/stratread.htm

B. Academic reading skills:

1. students.dartmouth.edu/academic-skills/learning-resources/learning-strategies/reading

2. www.uefap.com/reading/readfram.htm

3. www2.isu.edu/success/strategies/handouts.shtml

4. Writing Advice for Today's Online University Students: www.itdl.org/journal/sep_04/article07.htm

5. Writing an Essay: lklivingston.tripod.com/essay/links.html

6. Essay structure:

a. www.custom-essays.org/Essay_Structure.html

7. Writing with Statistics: owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/672/1/

8. Quoting, Paraphrasing and Summarizing: owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/563/1

9. Citation styles:

a. MLA: owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/

b. MLA FAQs: style.mla.org/category/ask-the-mla/

c. APA: owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/10/

d. APA FAQs: apastyle.org/learn/faqs/index.aspx

10. Different types of essays:

a. www.gallaudet.edu/tutorial-and-instructional-programs/english-center/the-process-and-type-of-writing-/different-kinds-of-essays

b. owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/685/01

c. www.thoughtco.com/the-types-of-essays-1857003

11. How to edit your writing - dangers of using spell check: www.youtube.com/watch?v=SaF8d9K-Z4M

12. University of Central Florida: Student Academic Resource Center--handouts on setting up a study-conducive environment and concentration: www.sarc.sdes.ucf.edu/?id+studyskills_handouts

13. YouTube videos should also be utilized--search for Study Skills, Notetaking, Time Management

 

Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing, and Outside of Class Assignments

A. Example reading assignment: "Unfinished Knowledge: The Story of Barbara" by Ryuko Kubota (published in College ESL, Vol. 10).

 

Discipline(s)

English as a Second Language