Academic Catalog

NCEL 403A: TRANSITIONING TO COLLEGE ESL PART I

Foothill College Course Outline of Record

Foothill College Course Outline of Record
Heading Value
Units: 0
Hours: 36 lecture per quarter (36 total per quarter)
Degree & Credit Status: Non-Degree-Applicable Non-Credit Course
Basic Skills, 4 Levels Below Transfer
Foothill GE: Non-GE
Transferable: None
Grade Type: Non-Credit Course (Receives no Grade)
Repeatability: Unlimited Repeatability

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to analyze their time management skills and create an individual study schedule.
  • Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to identify external and internal obstacles to studying and develop a plan to overcome these obstacles.
  • Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to utilize campus materials such as the Schedule of Classes and College Catalog to identify and register for appropriate classes.
  • Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to identify and describe services such as financial aid, academic counseling, learning centers for support services.

Description

Introduction for the adult English-learner to the community college campus and requirements for successful studies, and to prepare ESL students for successful transition to credit college-level coursework. Primary focus will be on listening and speaking activities in the classroom, including note taking and class participation.

Course Objectives

The student will be able to:
A. Analyze their time management skills and create individual study schedule.
B. Identify external and internal obstacles to studying and develop a plan to overcome these obstacles.
C. Utilize campus materials such as class schedule and class catalog to identify and register for appropriate classes.
D. Identify and describe student services such as financial aid, academic counseling, learning centers for support services.
E. Describe learning styles, identify their own learning styles, and utilize learning techniques that capitalize on their personal learning styles.
F. Employ different note-taking strategies (Cornell system, lists, outlines, cluster diagrams, T-charts, etc.) and develop techniques such as abbreviations, active listening, highlighting key points.
G. Utilize library resources.

Course Content

A. Analyze time management skills and create an individual study schedule.
1. Preparing for the instructor's lecture
2. Augmenting listening comprehension
a. General ideas, including listening for key words
b. Rhetorical cues in the lecture ("today," "First," "In addition to...", "Before we finish...")
c. Practicing active listening
d. Listening for details
e. Being curious and going one step further: supplementing reading with other materials (documentaries, websites, books, etc.)
f. Learning styles
B. Identify external and internal obstacles to studying and develop a plan to overcome these obstacles.
1. Schedule time for studying
2. Study for a test; different techniques
3. Take a test
4. Pay attention to the professor's cues
a. Pre-reading and predicting content
b. Research online for class materials/writing a paper for class
c. How to evaluate websites' veracity (why NOT to use Wikipedia)
d. Critical thinking in the classroom and on the internet
e. Note-taking during study time
f. Note-taking in class, including abbreviations and graphics
g. Learning groups/partners/buddy system (not studying alone)
h. Analyzing and asking what the instructor wants
i. Make inferences
j. Use suffixes/prefixes and strategies to understand new vocabulary
k. Identify cause and effect
l. Differentiate between different disciplines and what they emphasize
1) The arts may ask for a comparison/contrast of different treatments of the same topic
2) Science may concentrate on the scientific method
3) Political science may evaluation different social systems
C. Utilize campus materials such as class schedule and class catalog to identify and register for appropriate classes.
1. Prerequisites
2. Placement testing
D. Identify and describe student services such as financial aid, academic counseling, learning centers for support services.
1. Learn about campus services
a. Library and bookstore
b. Financial Aid
c. Academic counselors
d. Learning Center (including tutoring services)
e. Health services
f. Student clubs and organizations (building or joining a community)
E. Describe learning styles, identify one's own learning styles, and utilize learning techniques that capitalize on one's personal learning styles.
1. Visual
2. Audio

Lab Content

Not applicable.

Special Facilities and/or Equipment

None required.

Method(s) of Evaluation

A. Participation in feedback sessions and role-playing
B. Demonstration of acquired study skills through project completion
C. In-class evaluations by instructor of exercises and search skills (searching for information online or in campus materials
D. Role play of ideal student behavior in class, and with campus services, such as academic or financial counselor
E. Ability to discuss and demonstrate productive academic behavior (preparation, homework, in-class preparation)

Method(s) of Instruction

A. Lecture discussion
B. Cooperative learning experiences
C. Oral presentations
D. Role-plays
E. Group project

Representative Text(s) and Other Materials

No text will be required. Websites such as the following can be used:



Free university lectures:

www.openculture.com/freeonlinecourses

ocw.mit.edu

mediacentral.princeton.edu

oyc.yale.edu



Other reading/listening materials:

www.NPR.org

www.sciencefriday.com

ww2.kqed.org/forum

www.npr.org/sections/world

www.TED.com

Teachers and students should explore websites together, then choose (individually and as a group) from different categories (technology, entertainment, design, business, science, global issues) for a wide variety of disciplines covered in college courses.



Other articles to consider:

AARP Foundation. "An Assessment of Labor Force Projections Through 2018: Will Workers Have the Education Needed for the Available Jobs?" AARP, 2011. https://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/econ/labor-force-projections-workers-education--gates-foundation.pdf

Helmer, Jodi. "The Best Time of Day to Learn Something New." AARP. https://stayingsharp.aarp.org/art/discover/17/best-time-to-learn.html

Wheeler, Carol. "Learning a New Language at 50+." AARP, 2005. http://www.aarp.org/personal-growth/life-long-learning/info-06-2008/learning-a-new-language-at-50-plus.html

Jones, Beverly. "How to Take Control of Your Work Schedule." AARP, 2016. https://www.aarp.org/work/on-the-job/info-2016/work-schedule-time-management.html

 

Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing, and Outside of Class Assignments

A. Example reading assignment: "Unfinished Knowledge: The Story of Barbara" by Ryuko Kubota (published in College ESL, Vol. 10).

 

Discipline(s)

English as a Second Language