Academic Catalog

MDIA 12: POPULAR CULTURE & UNITED STATES HISTORY

Foothill College Course Outline of Record

Foothill College Course Outline of Record
Heading Value
Effective Term: Spring 2021
Units: 4
Hours: 4 lecture, 1 laboratory per week (60 total per quarter)
Advisory: Demonstrated proficiency in English by placement via multiple measures OR through an equivalent placement process OR completion of ESLL 125 & ESLL 249; not open to students with credit in F A 2.
Degree & Credit Status: Degree-Applicable Credit Course
Foothill GE: Area VI: United States Cultures & Communities
Transferable: CSU/UC
Grade Type: Letter Grade (Request for Pass/No Pass)
Repeatability: Not Repeatable

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Analyze popular culture as both reaction to and catalyst for events and trends in American history
  • Identify and evaluate the interpretation of American history through popular culture media.
  • Recognize and appreciate both the differences and similarities of our combined cultural history.

Description

Interdisciplinary overview of popular culture as a window for understanding American history and society. Theories and methods of analyzing the artifacts of popular culture. Overarching themes: 1) the interpretation of American history via popular culture media; 2) interaction between American historical events and trends, and popular culture.

Course Objectives

The student will be able to:
A. Analyze the relationship between popular culture and historical events and trends
B. Discuss the impact of diverse cultures within American culture
C. Identify and evaluate historical sources of popular culture
D. Compare and contrast the differences between recorded history and popular history
E. Evaluate the influence of contemporary thought on historical events
F. Articulate the cultural and social importance of popular culture in shaping American history
G. Appraise the importance of context and perspective when studying history through the lens of popular culture
H. Analyze the power of popular culture to influence politics, social movements, and economics

Course Content

A. History through the lens of pop culture
1. Films and television
a. Perspective of contemporary viewing audiences
b. Context of time of creation
c. Entertainment versus historical record
2. America and the Western
a. Cowboy as American symbol
b. Myth of the West
c. Changing role of gender and race
B. Popular culture and historical interaction
1. Politics and music (we will explore three of the following)
a. Counter culture and punk
b. Patriotism and country
c. Integration and rock 'n' roll
d. Oppression and hip hop
e. Reaction to war
2. Social movements and television (we will explore three of the following)
a. Mary Tyler Moore and feminism
b. All in the Family and prejudice
c. MASH and war
d. Ellen/Will & Grace and sexual orientation
e. Star Trek, tolerance, and technology
3. Contributions of immigrants (we will explore three of the following)
a. Food
b. Comedy
c. Fashion
d. Music
e. Film

Lab Content

A. 500 words minimum per bi-weekly lab essay applying concepts of unit to a contemporary artifact.

Special Facilities and/or Equipment

A. Lecture room equipped with projection equipment, video/DVD players, sound equipment, and a computer.
B. When taught via Foothill Global Access: on-going computer access with email and internet software capabilities.

Method(s) of Evaluation

A. Bi-weekly group discussion
1. One in-class essay or online discussion posting of 500 words minimum assembling students' previous knowledge of the topic to be discussed (one per unit)
B. Quiz based on readings (one per unit)
C. Bi-weekly group discussion
1. One in-class essay or online discussion posting of 500 words minimum applying concepts of unit to a contemporary artifact (one per unit)
D. Reflection essay
1. 500 words minimum essay reflecting on concepts learned

Method(s) of Instruction

A. Lecture presentations using mixed media sources
B. Classroom discussion via instructor-led prompts
C. Supplemental discussions on web-based course management system

Representative Text(s) and Other Materials

Campbell, Richard, Christopher R. Martin, and Bettina Fabos. Media and Culture. 12th ed. Boston: Bedford/ St. Martin's, 2019.
Brandt, Jenn, and Callie Clare. An Introduction to Popular Culture in the US; People, Politics, and Power. HPOD edition. New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018.
Open Education Resources, including online articles, blogs, podcasts.
 

Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing, and Outside of Class Assignments

A. Bi-weekly group discussion
1. One in-class essay or online discussion posting of 500 words minimum assembling students' previous knowledge of the topic to be discussed (one per unit)
B. Three chapters or articles required reading per unit
C. Quiz based on readings (one per unit)
D. Bi-weekly group discussion
1. One in-class essay or online discussion posting of 500 words minimum applying concepts of unit to a contemporary artifact (one per unit)
E. Reflection essay
1. 500 words minimum essay reflecting on concepts learned
 

Discipline(s)

Music or Humanities