Academic Catalog

LINC 66C: SEARCHING & RESEARCHING THE INTERNET

Foothill College Course Outline of Record

Foothill College Course Outline of Record
Heading Value
Units: 2
Hours: 2 lecture per week (24 total per quarter)
Advisory: Basic computer skills and knowledge of Macintosh or Windows operating systems; familiarity using Web browsers, email, bookmarking, searching and downloading; not open to students with credit in LINC 208.
Degree & Credit Status: Degree-Applicable Credit Course
Foothill GE: Non-GE
Transferable: CSU
Grade Type: Letter Grade (Request for Pass/No Pass)
Repeatability: Not Repeatable

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Explain and apply ethical uses of internet content, such as copyright and citations
  • Explore better methods for integrating the Internet into professional work, or personal tasks that stimulate higher order thinking skills (applying, evaluating, creating)
  • Employ use of advanced search techniques such as Boolean logic

Description

Intermediate course for those who use the Internet for personal research and in their work. Emphasizes using advanced search techniques that incorporate logical reasoning, critical thinking, essential questions, and inquiry-based learning to refine searches, maximize the advantages of different search engines, evaluate websites for credibility, understand the legitimacy of search results, and use search findings ethically.

Course Objectives

The student will be able to:
A. Explore better methods for integrating the Internet into professional work, or personal tasks that stimulate higher order thinking skills (applying, evaluating, creating)
B. Employ use of advanced search techniques such as Boolean logic
C. Explain and apply ethical uses of internet content, such as copyright and citations
D. Evaluate Internet resources for accuracy, authenticity, and ease of use
E. Organize searches and research that identifies the best resources on the Internet for the participant's specific purposes, whether educational, business-related, or personal
F. Develop best practices to effectively use the Internet for both professional work and personal learning

Course Content

A. Explore better methods and strategies for integrating the Internet searches
1. Internet overview
a. History of the Internet
b. Vocabulary
c. Browsers (Google, Yahoo!, Bing, etc.)
d. Saving and organizing bookmarks
e. Portals and online resources for different work forces
B. Employ use of advanced search techniques such as Boolean logic
1. Effectively using search engines by utilizing terms such as AND, NOT, and OR
2. Using the "Advanced Search" feature of various search engines
C. Explain and apply ethical uses of internet content copyright and citation documentation
1. Copyright
2. Appropriately using Internet images
3. Knowing when information on the Internet utilized in your own projects must be cited
4. Writing correct citations
D. Evaluate Internet resources for accuracy, authenticity, and ease of use
1. Analyzing the dependability of open-source sites such as Wikipedia
2. Cross-checking facts
3. Selecting the most reliable resources for a task
E. Organize searches and research
1. Using social bookmarking sites
2. Using browser bookmark features
F. Develop best practices to effectively use the Internet
1. Personal applications
2. Professional applications
3. Using affinity, topic, issue oriented online groups for Internet research

Lab Content

Not applicable.

Special Facilities and/or Equipment

A. When offered on/off campus: Lecture room equipped with LCD projector, whiteboard, and a demonstration computer connected online. Computer laboratories equipped with online PCs and/or Macintosh computers, network server access, and printers.
B. When taught via the Internet: Students must have current email accounts and/or ongoing access to computers with email software, web browsing capability, and access to the World Wide Web.

Method(s) of Evaluation

The student will demonstrate proficiency by:
A. Creating the search and research project using characteristics of quality defined by the class.
B. Writing an evaluation critique and reflection for their own and peers' final projects, with emphasis on use of constructive comments and suggested improvements with respect to established characteristics of good multimedia design.
C. Participating in class discussions and critiques

Method(s) of Instruction

During periods of instruction the student will be actively engaged in:
A. Writing notes, listening, and participating in lecture presentation and class discussion using the terminology of the software product.
B. Observing an instructor-led demonstration and student practice of search techniques.
C. In-class presentations and peer review to critique class projects.

Representative Text(s) and Other Materials

A. Instructor-assigned notes and materials.

1. Example textbook: Baker, Frank W. Media Literacy in the K-12 Classroom. International Society for Technology in Education, 2012.

B. When course is taught online: Additional information, notes, handouts, syllabus, assignments, tests, and other relevant course material will be delivered by email and on the World Wide Web, and discussion may be handled with internet communication tools.

 

Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing, and Outside of Class Assignments

A. Each class session requires the student to read and analyze selected websites or student projects related to that session's topics.

B. Each session's topic requires a written response to a prompt that is turned in for instructor or peer review. Each prompt is designed to be a draft of a section of the student's completed project. Instructor feedback should be reflected in the final product.

 

Discipline(s)

Instructional Design/Technology