Academic Catalog

LIBR 10: INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE RESEARCH

Foothill College Course Outline of Record

Foothill College Course Outline of Record
Heading Value
Units: 1
Hours: 1 lecture per week (12 total per quarter)
Advisory: Familiarity with Macs or PCs; not open to students with credit in LIBR 10H or 71.
Degree & Credit Status: Degree-Applicable Credit Course
Foothill GE: Area VII: Lifelong Learning
Transferable: CSU/UC
Grade Type: Letter Grade (Request for Pass/No Pass)
Repeatability: Not Repeatable

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Students will be able to evaluate an information source.
  • Students will be able to find periodical articles in online databases.
  • Students will be able to find relevant books in the library (online or in print).

Description

Intended for students writing a research paper in another class. Strategies and methods to identify a research topic and then find, evaluate, and use information in an ethical way. Interdisciplinary application of concepts, often covering multicultural topics.

Course Objectives

The student will be able to:
A. Determine an appropriate scope of investigation
B. Recognize that information creation is a process
C. Engage in searching as strategic exploration
D. Find required information
E. Use research tools and indicators of authority to determine the credibility of sources, understanding the elements that might temper this credibility
F. Articulate and act on the implications of information having value

Course Content

A. Determine an appropriate scope of investigation
1. Identify a research topic or other information need
2. Formulate questions for research based on information gaps or on reexamination of existing, possibly conflicting, information
3. Develop strategy to answer questions or find information on topic
a. Find and use background information
b. Deal with complex research by breaking complex questions into simple ones, limiting the scope of investigations (narrow a topic)
c. Identify key concepts
B. Recognize that information creation is a process
1. Articulate the capabilities and constraints of information developed through various creation processes
a. Information cycle (timeline)
b. Primary vs. secondary sources
c. Popular vs. scholarly sources
C. Engage in searching as strategic exploration
1. Utilize divergent (e.g., brainstorming) and convergent (e.g., selecting the best source) thinking when searching
2. Match information needs and search strategies to appropriate search tools
a. Reference sources, including health sources
b. Library catalog
c. Library databases, including health sources
d. Internet search engines and tools
3. Design and refine needs and search strategies as necessary, based on search results
D. Find required information
1. Manage searching processes and results effectively
E. Use research tools and indicators of authority to determine the credibility of sources, understanding the elements that might temper this credibility
1. Define different types of authority, such as subject expertise (e.g., scholarship), societal position (e.g., public office or title), or special experience (e.g., participating in a historic event)
2. Recognize that authoritative content may be packaged formally or informally and may include sources of all media types
3. Consider elements that might temper credibility, such as accuracy, objectivity, and currency
4. Develop awareness of the importance of assessing content with a skeptical stance and with a self-awareness of their own biases
F. Articulate and act on the implications of information having value
1. Give credit to the original ideas of others through proper attribution and citation types
2. Articulate the purpose and distinguishing characteristics of copyright, fair use, open access, and the public domain
3. Make informed choices regarding their online actions in full awareness of issues related to privacy and the commodification of personal information

Lab Content

Not applicable.

Special Facilities and/or Equipment

A. Classroom and/or lab equipped with computers, internet access, printers, browser software, overhead projector, LCD display, and screen.
B. When taught via Foothill Global Access: ongoing access to computers with email, internet and other online capabilities.

Method(s) of Evaluation

Evaluation methods may include but are not limited to:
A. Class discussions
B. Computer assignments
C. Written assignments
D. Objective quizzes and final exam
E. Annotated bibliography

Method(s) of Instruction

A. Lecture
B. Discussion
C. Cooperative learning exercises
D. Oral presentations
E. Electronic discussions/chat
F. Demonstration

Representative Text(s) and Other Materials

Choosing and Using Sources: A Guide to Academic Research. 2018. Free ebook: ohiostate.pressbooks.pub/choosingsources

Information Literacy: Basic Research Skills. 2019. Free OER: library.sdcity.edu/InfoLitOER

 

Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing, and Outside of Class Assignments

A. Reading: Weekly reading from text.

B. Writing: Annotated bibliography of sources for a research paper.

 

Discipline(s)

Library Science