Academic Catalog

JRNL 53A: STUDENT MEDIA PRACTICUM I

Foothill College Course Outline of Record

Foothill College Course Outline of Record
Heading Value
Units: 5
Hours: 3 lecture, 6 laboratory per week (108 total per quarter)
Advisory: ENGL 1A, 1AH, or 1S & 1T; not open to students with credit in JRNL 49.
Degree & Credit Status: Degree-Applicable Credit Course
Foothill GE: Non-GE
Transferable: CSU
Grade Type: Letter Grade (Request for Pass/No Pass)
Repeatability: Not Repeatable
Formerly: JRNL 49

Description

Provides practical experience in creating basic news and feature content as members of the college newspaper, magazine or online media staff, which includes a lab that regularly produces a news or feature non-fiction product with a journalism emphasis by and for students and distributed to a campus or community audience. Must include weekly news assignments. May include a variety of student media across multiple platforms, including print, broadcast, and online. Includes practical experience in design/layout, visual, online, multimedia journalism, and emerging technologies. Must be student-produced with student leadership.

Course Objectives

The student will be able to:
A. Employ journalistic reporting and writing skills to produce stories for a student media product, such as a newspaper, magazine or website.
B. Demonstrate an understanding of the legal and ethical aspects of student media.
C. Utilize basic media production technology and processes to present assignments.

Course Content

A. Employ journalistic reporting and writing skills to produce stories for a student media product, such as a newspaper, magazine, broadcast, or website
1. Define relevant news content and best form for publication, such as photojournalism, broadcast journalism, print (magazine or newspaper), online and multimedia journalism
2. Gather news information weekly
3. Complete assignments for publication by stated deadlines
4. Revise and copy edit basic news and information into publishable form, with attention to accuracy, clarity, thoroughness, fairness, AP Style, and media law and ethics
5. Build a portfolio of completed projects for student media that demonstrates a range of storytelling formats/styles
B. Demonstrate an understanding of the legal and ethical aspects of student media
1. Discuss First Amendment issues
2. Discuss libel, privacy and copyright law and ethics issues and policies affecting media
3. Critique and self-critique newspapers, magazines, news websites and/or news broadcasts
C. Utilize basic media production technology and processes to present assignments
1. Develop news stories through written, visual, audio, video or other multimedia formats
2. Determine the best format--print, multimedia, visual, etc.--for telling basic news stories
3. Complete assignments and electronically file stories, photos and video
4. Use software and web tools to present content visually
5. Develop effective design/layout for story presentation
6. Apply AP Style and legal and ethical guidelines

Lab Content

Production of a regular news or feature non-fiction product with a journalism emphasis by and for students and distributed to a campus or community audience. Must include weekly newsgathering activities; regardless of publication frequency.
A. Finding stories
B. Reporting and writing news, feature, opinion and sports stories
C. Using video equipment, editing video
D. Using a digital camera and photo editing software
E. Electronically filing stories, photos and other visual media
F. Proofreading, copyediting and improving stories
G. Applying standards, including multiple named sources, adequate lead, spelling, grammar, AP Style
H. Using design software
I. Interviewing for news media
J. Role of student media on campus
K. Finding college, expert and real person sources using standard methods, websites and social media
L. Online and multimedia presentation of stories
M. Utilizing journalism resources, such as textbooks, guides and websites to improve skills
N. Understanding and applying ethical standards for news reporting and photojournalism
O. Understanding and applying ethical standards for news reporting
P. Understanding news staff organization
Q. Understanding media law as it applies to journalism
R. Using software and web programs to present stories
S. Exploring careers in news media
T. Exploring entrepreneurial opportunities in news media
U. Using critique and self-critique to improve the product
V. Understanding the business side of student media, such as advertising, promotions, printing and distribution

Special Facilities and/or Equipment

A. A classroom/laboratory equipped as a news room: computers with word processing, graphic and page layout software; internet access; cameras; telephones; fax machine; portable recorders; references; basic supplies.
B. When taught as an online distance learning section, students and faculty need ongoing and continuous internet and email access.

Method(s) of Evaluation

A. Assignments evaluated for adherence to conventions of journalistic style, ethics, professionalism, and deadline timeliness across multiple platforms.
B. Comprehension tests and a final exam requiring students to demonstrate critical thinking using concepts that have been introduced and studied throughout the course.
C. Peer critiques and self-critiques evaluated based on thoroughness and identification of areas needing improvement.
D. Review of portfolio and log for completeness and professionalism of presentation.

Method(s) of Instruction

A. Lecture and visual aids
B. Discussion of assigned reading
C. Collaborative learning and small group exercises
D. Laboratory experience which involve students in formal exercises of news gathering and reporting activities

Representative Text(s) and Other Materials

Examples of Primary Texts and References:
Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manual. New York: Associated Press, 2012.
Harrower, Tim. Inside Reporting. 3rd ed. McGraw-Hill, 2013.
The Script Handbook. Latest ed.
Examples of Supporting Texts and References:
Kanigel, Rachele. The Student Newspaper Survival Guide. 2nd ed. Wiley-Blackwell, 2012.
The Missouri Group. Telling the Story: Writing for Print, Broadcast and Online Media. 5th ed. Bedford/St. Martin's, 2013.
Webster's New World College Dictionary. Recent ed. New York: Macmillian.
Harrower, Tim. The Newspaper Designer's Handbook. McGraw-Hill.
Associated Press. Associate Press Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law. Basic Books.
Kessler, Lauren, and Duncan McDonald. When Words Collide: A Media Writer's Guide to Grammar and Style. 8th ed. Cengage, 2012.
Strunk, William. The Elements of Style. Tribecka Books.
 

Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing, and Outside of Class Assignments

A. Complete one or more basic reporting/writing and/or visual media and/or online assignments per week, such as coverage of one event; submit by deadline.
B. Read about and react to journalistic concepts and issues using critical thinking skills.
C. Participate in self-critiques and peer critiques.
D. Compile a digital or print portfolio of completed work, including a log of activities with descriptions of learning experiences and time spent on assignments.
 

Discipline(s)

Communication Studies, English, Journalism