Academic Catalog

JRNL 22B: INTERMEDIATE REPORTING/NEWSWRITING

Foothill College Course Outline of Record

Foothill College Course Outline of Record
Heading Value
Units: 5
Hours: 4 lecture, 3 laboratory per week (84 total per quarter)
Advisory: ENGL 1A, 1AH, or 1S & 1T; not open to students with credit in JRNL 21A.
Degree & Credit Status: Degree-Applicable Credit Course
Foothill GE: Non-GE
Transferable: CSU/UC
Grade Type: Letter Grade (Request for Pass/No Pass)
Repeatability: Not Repeatable
Formerly: JRNL 21A

Description

This course is a continuation of the introductory newswriting/reporting course (JRNL 22A) and focuses on coverage of public affairs beats, including local and regional government, police, courts, and school and city boards. Fundamentals in feature writing for newspapers, magazines and other media with instruction and practice in profile, human interest, consumer and interpretive news features. It includes both on- and off-campus reporting and writing/news presentation for a variety of news purposes and through multiple platforms with practical experience in interviewing, writing special story types and revising.

Course Objectives

The student will be able to:
A. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the fundamentals of feature writing and the organization and structure of feature stories
B. Gather, organize and synthesize information to compile into feature stories, and write these stories under deadline pressure
C. Prepare feature stories for converging audiences
D. Create plan for submitting story to freelance market
E. Employ editing techniques and use journalistic style
F. Identify and apply fundamental media law concepts, such as libel and privacy rights, and basic freedom of information tools, including public records and open meeting laws
G. Read and analyze current events news

Course Content

A. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the fundamentals of feature writing and the organization and structure of feature stories
1. The news peg
2. Feature leads
3. Analysis of examples of good feature writing
4. Recognizing important, compelling details
5. Types of features: covering city councils, school boards, courts, police, and other local governmental bodies
6. Difference between hard news story, soft news or feature story, opinion story
7. The complex, multi-source feature long form story
B. Gather, organize and synthesize information to compile into feature stories, and write these stories under deadline pressure
1. Report and write multiple on- and off-campus public affairs-type stories, such as coverage of local or regional government, public safety, courts and education
2. Provide innovative story ideas
3. Gather information from diverse sources
4. Practice interviewing, note-taking and fact-checking
5. Research and develop stories
6. Conduct professional interviews
7. Organize notes
C. Prepare feature stories for converging audiences
1. The profile
2. The consumer feature
3. The human interest story
4. The opinion piece
5. The me-story (emotional, touching or humorous)
6. Using social media as a reporting tool
7. Writing for various publication formats: print, online, multimedia, broadcast, and public relations
8. Producing stories through audio, video and other multimedia formats
9. Locate and use diverse human, paper and electronic sources
D. Create plan for submitting story to freelance market
1. Identify markets for freelance opportunities
2. Write query letter and submit story to appropriate market
3. Unusual and minority markets
4. Produce at least one major assignment utilizing basic multimedia skills, such as taking a photograph or capturing an audio/video interview, and/or employing social media or other emerging technology tools
E. Employ editing techniques and use journalistic style
1. Practice revision and copy-editing
2. Apply AP Style
F. Identify and apply fundamental media law concepts, such as libel and privacy rights, and basic freedom of information tools, including public records and open meeting laws
1. Non-sexist, non-biased language
2. Apply ethics codes and practices
3. Open meeting laws, public records and freedom of information requests
4. Other media law concepts: libel and privacy
G. Read and analyze current events news
1. Examine the basic concepts and techniques used in broadcast/webcast news and public relations writing

Lab Content

Assist in production of a regular news or feature non-fiction product with a journalism emphasis by and for students and distributed to a campus or community audience. Must include weekly newsgathering activities regardless of publication frequency.

Special Facilities and/or Equipment

A. Computer with word processing software and access to the internet, portable tape recorder/camera.
B. When taught as an online distance learning section, students and faculty need ongoing and continuous internet and email access.

Method(s) of Evaluation

A. Reporting assignments/projects across multiple platforms
B. Quizzes/exams
C. Critiques
D. Peer critiques
E. Adherence to professional protocols (meeting deadlines, attendance, adherence to ethics)

Method(s) of Instruction

A. Lecture and visual aids
B. Discussion of assigned reading
C. Discussion and problem solving performed in class
D. In-class essays
E. In-class exploration of internet sites
F. Quiz and examination review performed in class
G. Homework and extended projects
H. Guest speakers
I. Collaborative learning and small group exercises

Representative Text(s) and Other Materials

Examples of Primary Texts and References:
Harrower, Tim. Inside Reporting. 3rd ed. McGraw-Hill, 2012.
Friedlander, Edward Jay, and John Lee. Feature Writing for Newspapers and Magazines: The Pursuit of Excellence. 7th ed. Pearson, 2010.
Knight, Robert M. Journalistic Writing: Building the Skills, Honing the Craft. 3rd ed. Marion Press, 2010.
Williams, Eesha. Grassroots Journalism: A Practical Manual. 2012.
Examples of Supporting Texts and References:
Goldstein, Norm. Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manual. New York: The Associated Press, 2013.
Arnold, George T. Media Writer's Handbook: A Guide to Common Editing and Writing Problems. 6th ed. McGraw-Hill, 2012.
Kessler, Lauren, and Duncan McDonald. When Words Collide: A Media Writer's Guide to Grammar and Style. 8th ed. Cengage, 2012.
 

Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing, and Outside of Class Assignments

A. Reading approximately 250 pages from a textbook, websites and/or handouts that include:
1. Explanation of feature-writing style and leads
2. Suggestions for finding diverse sources
3. Examples of high-quality feature stories from professional media
4. Media ethics and law applied to feature writing and freelance writing
B. Writing five feature stories, including:
1. A multi-source personal profile
2. An enterprise story demonstrating choice of diverse, reliable sources
3. An entertainment review and/or opinion story
4. A multi-source story that localizes a regional, national or international story
C. In-class assignments and exercises and a final exam to demonstrate comprehension of journalistic standards and critical thinking as applied to sourcing and writing feature stories
D. Presenting at least one story as an online presentation, such as a blog or website with links and graphics
 

Discipline(s)

Communication Studies, English, Journalism