Academic Catalog

ESLL 228: DEVELOPING LANGUAGE SKILLS FOR ESL STUDENTS

Foothill College Course Outline of Record

Foothill College Course Outline of Record
Heading Value
Units: 10
Hours: 10 lecture per week (120 total per quarter)
Prerequisite: TOEFL score of 475 to 499 or appropriate placement test score.
Advisory: Designed for students whose native language is not English; not open to students with credit in ESL 158.
Degree & Credit Status: Non-Degree-Applicable Credit Course
Basic Skills, 4 Levels Below Transfer
Foothill GE: Non-GE
Transferable: None
Grade Type: Letter Grade (Request for Pass/No Pass)
Repeatability: Not Repeatable

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Respond to varied types of aural input (instructions, telephone messages, conversations, short talks).
  • Effectively participate in social interactions and group discussions to acquire and give needed information.

Description

An adaptive level course for intermediate-to-advanced students who use English as a second language. Designed to improve grammar, writing, reading, and speaking skills in order to handle the challenges of using English in college academic programs.

Course Objectives

The student will be able to:
A. demonstrate comprehension of listening tasks, i.e., instructions, directions, telephone messages, conversations, and short talks on familiar topics, short lectures on a variety of academic topics, using a variety of strategies for each purpose.
B. respond to listening tasks in writing and speaking.
C. participate effectively in whole class and small group activities.
D. correctly use the following structures in complete sentences in connected spoken English and in short pieces of writing about new information, conjectures, and logical relationships with special attention to the diverse cultures and perspectives represented by the students in the class.
E. read unedited/authentic texts with good comprehension and appropriate speed, from newspapers, magazines, textbooks, other non-fiction works, and fiction.

Course Content

A. Demonstrate comprehension of listening tasks, i.e., instructions, directions, telephone messages, conversations, and short talks on familiar topics, short lectures on a variety of academic topics, using a variety of strategies for each purpose.
1. recognize language signaling the main idea or key information
2. recognize language introducing a definition
3. identify language signaling a transition between ideas
4. recognize language signaling a definition
5. identify language pointing to examples
6. recognize language indicating important information
B. Respond to listening tasks in writing and speaking
1. take notes in informal outline and use notes to give an oral summary
2. write down key words and ideas using
3. use symbols to note words and ideas
4. organize key ideas in visual form in note taking
5. describe orally and in note taking graphics used in a lecture or presentation
6. annotate and highlight key ideas in note taking
C. Participate effectively in whole class and small group activities
1. enter a discussion already in process about ideas in listening tasks
2. contribute own ideas
3. interrupt to ask for information and clarification
4. agree and disagree
5. present and support own opinions
6. connect your ideas to others' ideas
7. participate in keeping discussion focused on topic
D. Correctly use the following structures in complete sentences in connected spoken English and in short pieces of writing about new information, conjectures, and logical relationships with special attention to the diverse cultures and perspectives represented by the students in the class.
1. present and present progressive
2. past and past progressive
3. future with will, be going to and present progressive
4. present perfect and present perfect progressive
5. present and past passive
6. logical modals of probability (might, must, and should) in limited contexts
7. modals reflecting past time (could have, may have, might have, should have, must have)
E. Read unedited/authentic texts with good comprehension and appropriate speed, from newspapers, magazines, textbooks, other non-fiction works, and fiction.
1. recognize keywords critical to understanding the text
2. use context clues to guess the meanings of words
3. significantly expand both active and passive vocabulary
4. understand abstract language
5. distinguish between literal and figurative language
6. skim for format and organizational elements in order to predict content
7. extract main ideas
8. make inferences
9. relate acquired information to personal experiences
10. analyze, categorize, classify, paraphrase, synthesize, and evaluate ideas orally and in writing

Lab Content

Not applicable.

Special Facilities and/or Equipment

When taught via Foothill Global Access, on-going access to computer with email software and hardware; email address.

Method(s) of Evaluation

A. Communicative, contextualized in-class assignments
B. Homework
C. Oral and written production of extended discourse
D. Oral and written tests

Method(s) of Instruction

Lecture, discussion, cooperative learning exercises, oral presentations, demonstration.

Representative Text(s) and Other Materials

Instructors should choose a textbook from each category from the list below. If, however, a faculty member would prefer to use a textbook not on the list, he or she must contact a full-time faculty member who regularly teaches the course to explain how the adoption would serve to achieve the learning outcomes specified in the course outline of record.



Baker-Gonzalez, Joan, and Eileen K. Blau.World of Reading 3. White Plains, NY: Pearson Education, Inc., 2009.

Barton. Northstar 3: Read + Write, Level 3. 4th ed. White Plains, NY: Pearson Longman, 2015.

Wegman, Brenda, and Miki Prijic Knezevic. Mosaic One: A Reading Skills Book. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 2014.

Smith. Reading for Today: Concepts, Level 4. 3rd ed. Cengage, 2011.

Sarosy, Peg, and Kathy Sherak. Lecture Ready 2: Strategies for Academic Listening, Note-taking, Discussion. 2nd ed. NY: Oxford University Press, 2013.

Solorzano, Helen. Northstar 3: Listen + Speak, Level 3. 4th ed. White Plains, NY: Pearson Longman, 2015.

Fuchs, Marjorie, and Margaret Bonner. Focus on Grammar 4: A High-Intermediate Course for Reference and Practice. 4th ed. White Plains, NY: Longman, 2012.

Azar, Betty. Understanding and Using English Grammar. 4th ed. New York: Prentice Hall Regents, 2009.



Recommended:

Longman Dictionary of American English. 4th ed. Essex: Pearson Education Limited, 2008.

 

Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing, and Outside of Class Assignments

A. Readings from the text.

B. Writing of journal entries, sentence and paragraph responses to readings.

C. Writing summaries of listening tasks, e.g., academic lectures, and of readings.

 

Discipline(s)

English as a Second Language