Academic Catalog

ENGL 80: INTRODUCTION TO TRAVEL WRITING

Foothill College Course Outline of Record

Foothill College Course Outline of Record
Heading Value
Units: 4
Hours: 4 lecture per week (48 total per quarter)
Advisory: Demonstrated proficiency in English by placement via multiple measures OR through an equivalent placement process OR completion of ESLL 125 & ESLL 249.
Degree & Credit Status: Degree-Applicable Credit Course
Foothill GE: Non-GE
Transferable: CSU
Grade Type: Letter Grade (Request for Pass/No Pass)
Repeatability: Not Repeatable

Student Learning Outcomes

  • The student will be able to: Recognize, evaluate, and produce characteristics of travel writing.
  • The student will be able to: employ skills in reflection and cultural analysis to draw meaning from observation and research

Description

An introductory course in travel writing. Focus on recognizing, evaluating, and producing the characteristics of travel writing in a range of travel writing genres. Practice in skills of observation, research, and reflection to understand aspects of place and draw meaning from travel experiences. Recognition and evaluation of publishing options.

Course Objectives

The student will be able to:
A. Recognize, evaluate, and produce common types of travel writing
B. Recognize, evaluate, and produce characteristics of travel writing
C. Employ skills in observation and research to identify and understand aspects of place
D. Employ skills in reflection and cultural analysis to draw meaning from observation and research
E. Provide constructive critique of peer writing in a workshop format
F. Recognize and evaluate publishing markets for travel writing

Course Content

A. Recognize, evaluate, and produce common types of travel writing
1. Consumer travel writing
a. Travel articles
b. Destination pieces
c. Round-ups
d. Advice
e. Guidebooks
2. Journalistic travel writing
a. Features
3. “Armchair” travel writing
a. Essay
b. Memoir
4. New Media
a. Travel websites/blogs
b. Photography
B. Recognize, evaluate, and produce characteristics of travel writing
1. Sense of place
2. Sensory qualities
3. Diction
a. Figurative language
1) Similes and metaphors
b. Alliteration and onomatopoeia
c. Personification
d. Dynamic verbs and strong nouns
4. Voice
5. Structure
a. Lede, nut graf, body, kicker
b. Sidebars
c. Free-form
6. Point of view
a. First person
b. Invisible narrator
7. Angle
a. Unique focus
b. Thematic, such as:
1) Food
2) Nature/environment
8. Sense of audience
C. Employ skills in observation and research to identify and understand aspects of place
1. Observing and taking notes
2. Primary research
a. Formal interviews
b. Informal interviews
4. Secondary research
a. Travel publications
b. Fact-checking
c. Relevant people
d. Relevant history
e. Cultural information
f. Events and attractions
D. Employ techniques in reflection and cultural analysis to draw meaning from observation and research
1. Critically analyze and interpret travel experiences
2. Identify comparative differences between the familiar and unfamiliar
3. Identify larger meaning and themes for readers
4. Identifying, analyze, and describe representative cultural artifacts
a. Historical significance
b. Cultural perspectives
E. Provide constructive critique of peer writing in a workshop format
F. Recognize and evaluate publishing markets for travel writing
1. Identify target publications
2. Evaluate for audience, style, aesthetic, angles, and tone
3. Pitch letters
4. Self-publishing: blogs and websites

Lab Content

Not applicable.

Special Facilities and/or Equipment

A. When taught on campus, computers with capacity to run appropriate software.
B. When taught via Foothill Global Access, on-going access to computer with Email and basic software capabilities (word processing, presentation, spreadsheet); Email address.

Method(s) of Evaluation

A. Reading Journals: critical analysis of a variety of travel writing
B. Observation and Research Journals
C. Written assignments and workshop critique
D. Capstone Portfolio

Method(s) of Instruction

A. Lecture in the common types and characteristics of travel writing
B. Instructor-facilitated activities in observation, research, reflection, and analysis

Representative Text(s) and Other Materials

Allende, Isabel. “Isabel Allende on the Amazon.” Salon Media Group (25 Mar. 1997). Web: 27 Oct. 2013. salon.com

Bryson, Bill. I’m a Stranger Here Myself: Notes on Returning to America After Twenty Years Away. New York: Broadway Books, 2000.

Curtis, Wayne. “No Room at the Inn.” The Atlantic (Nov. 2001). Web: 02 Nov. 2013. theatlantic.com

Higgins, Michelle. “One is No Longer the Loneliest Number.” The New York Times (02 Dec. 2007). Web: 11 Nov. 2013. nytimes.com

Iyer, Pico. “The Shock of Arrival.” Pico Iyer (01 Jan. 2009). Web: 29 Oct. 2013. picoiyerjourneys.com

Jungles in Paris. Web: 03 Dec. 2013. www.junglesinparis.com

Pham, Andrew. Catfish and Mandala. New York: MacMillan Picador, 2000.

Torpey, Paul. “Top Ten Haunted Places in the U.K.” The Guardian (31 Oct. 2007). Web: 09 Nov. 2013. theguardian.com

 

Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing, and Outside of Class Assignments

A. Reading and informal journal evaluations of a variety of travel writing

B. Observing places and taking notes

C. Conducting primary and secondary research on locations

D. Reflecting on larger meaning and significance of locations and their artifacts

E. Drafting written travel pieces

 

Discipline(s)

English