Academic Catalog

ENGL 34C: LITERATURE INTO FILM

Foothill College Course Outline of Record

Foothill College Course Outline of Record
Heading Value
Units: 4
Hours: 4 lecture per week (48 total per quarter)
Advisory: Demonstrated proficiency in English by placement via multiple measures OR through an equivalent placement process OR completion of ESLL 125 & ESLL 249.
Degree & Credit Status: Degree-Applicable Credit Course
Foothill GE: Area I: Humanities
Transferable: CSU/UC
Grade Type: Letter Grade (Request for Pass/No Pass)
Repeatability: Not Repeatable

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Situate film adaptations of novels, short stories, poems, and plays in global, historical, and literary contexts.
  • Apply basic literary terminologies, theories, categories, motifs, and genres appropriate to an introductory college-level discussion of literature.
  • Appraise the value, cross-cultural significance, and meaning of contemporary literature to film adaptations.

Description

Examination of the ways great world literature throughout world history has been adapted for the modern day movie going audience, from one medium to the other - from text to film or television series. Consideration of: 1. how film makers adapt literature to film, considering the conventions of each medium; 2. how film and literature may evoke similar or different meanings, considering historical, cultural and other contexts for creation and reception; 3. how one medium may inform the other.

Course Objectives

The student will be able to:
A. Situate film adaptations of novels, short stories, poems, and plays in global, historical, and literary contexts.
B. Apply basic literary terminologies, theories, categories, motifs, and genres appropriate to an introductory college-level discussion of literature.
C. Appraise the value, cross-cultural significance, and meaning of contemporary literature to film adaptations.

Course Content

A. Situate film adaptations of novels, short stories, poems, and plays in global, historical, and literary contexts
1. History of narrative and visual communication
2. Evolution of communication toward writing
a. Speech/Symbols
b. Cave painting, petroglyphs, pictograms, ideograms, writing, alphabet
c. Focus on the early pictographic forms as sequential narrative art
3. History of Film
a. Early narratives in cinematic art (19th-20th century)
b. Defining film
c. Evolution: Silent, Sound, Color, Digital
d. Variety of forms and emerging forms
B. Apply basic literary terminologies, theories, categories, motifs, and genres appropriate to an introductory college-level discussion of literature
1. Application of literary theory to film
2. Modern Criticism: New Critical and Structural criticism
a. Plot, theme, structures
b. Imagery, symbol, metaphor
3. Post Modern Criticism: Deconstruction, Feminist, Marxist, Psychoanalytical and other literary theory
a. Multiplicity of meanings through different lenses appropriate to textual/visual analysis
4. Film analysis
a. Composition, contrast, point of view, framing, sound, music
4. Genre analysis: Memoir, Tragedy, Comedy, Science Fiction, Crime, Epic, Animation and other genres
C. Appraise the value, cross-cultural significance, and meaning of contemporary literature to film adaptations
1. Critique and analyze film design and narrative
2. More than Summer Blockbusters: separate content/form
3. Visual only storytelling and silent film
4. Reading cinema/reading text/conflict and synergy
5. Intertextuality/Metatextuality
6. Socio-cultural issues addressed through film
7. Compare/contrast similar forms or themes across cultures

Lab Content

Not applicable.

Special Facilities and/or Equipment

Access to internet when offered online.

Method(s) of Evaluation

A. At least two critical papers and/or essay exams.
B. Quizzes, journals, midterm, oral reports, and/or final exam.
C. Participation in classroom discussion.

Method(s) of Instruction

A. Lecture
B. Discussion
C. Small Group activities

Representative Text(s) and Other Materials

Corrigan, Timothy. Film and Literature: An Introduction and Reader. Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2012.

Bluestone, George. Novels into Film. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins, 2003.

Cahir, Linda Costanzo. Literature into Film: Theory and Practical Approaches. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2006.

Smiley, Robin H. Books into Film: The Stuff That Dreams Are Made of. Santa Barbara: Capra, 2003.

Hosseini, Khaled. The Kite Runner. New York: Riverhead, 2003.

Capote, Truman. Breakfast at Tiffany's: A Short Novel and Three Stories. New York: Random House, 1958.

Wilde, Oscar. The Importance of Being Earnest. New York: Dover Publications, 1990.

Austen, Jane and Kristin Flieger Samuelian. Emma. Peterborough, Ont.: Broadview, 2004.

Chaucer, Geoffrey and Nevill Coghill. The Canterbury Tales. Londres: Penguin, 2003.



Although some of these texts are older than the suggested "5 years or newer" standard, they remain seminal texts in this area of study.

 

Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing, and Outside of Class Assignments

A. Compare/contrast two novel to film adaptations in two separate genres, to examine how the artform employs the use of cinema, sound, and image to evoke a message for readers.

B. In what ways do visuals, sound, music, and acting create meaning in film across genres?

 

Discipline(s)

English