Academic Catalog

CRWR 6: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING

Foothill College Course Outline of Record

Foothill College Course Outline of Record
Heading Value
Units: 5
Hours: 5 lecture per week (60 total per quarter)
Prerequisite: Demonstrated proficiency in English by placement via multiple measures OR through an equivalent placement process OR completion of ESLL 125 & ESLL 249.
Degree & Credit Status: Degree-Applicable Credit Course
Foothill GE: Area I: Humanities
Transferable: CSU/UC
Grade Type: Letter Grade (Request for Pass/No Pass)
Repeatability: Not Repeatable

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Evaluate and compare ways communities have used poetry create space, sustain community, challenge stereotypes, preserve cultural knowledge, and respond to injustice
  • Use the elements of the craft with proficiency in both poetry and fiction.

Description

Explicit instruction and practice in writing poetry and short fiction. Assignments include reading, analyzing and responding to published and student work and writing original work. Analysis of public readings and/or interviews with writers.

Course Objectives

The student will be able to:
A. Demonstrate understanding of the basic elements of poetry.
B. Analyze published poetry.
C. Critique student poetry.
D. Create original poetry, demonstrating basic elements.
E. Demonstrate understanding of the basic elements of short fiction.
F. Analyze published short fiction.
G. Critique student short fiction.
H. Create original short fiction, demonstrating basic elements.
I. Participate effectively in a workshop setting.
J. Revise original poetry and short fiction based on workshop critiques.
K. Produce self-analyses of poetry and short fiction.
L. Compare and contrast voices which reflect a diversity of cultural and social milieus.

Course Content

A. Understand basic elements of poetry
1. Form
a. Formal poetry: sonnets, etc.
b. Free verse
c. Stanza
d. Line (end-stopped and enjambed)
2. Content
a. Sound: meter and rhythm, consonance and assonance, repetition and rhyme
b. Figures of speech: simile and metaphor
c. Imagery
d. Tone
B. Analyze published poetry
1. Identify significant elements
2. Determine how these elements contribute to poet's purpose
C. Critique student poetry
1. Identify significant elements
2. Determine how these elements contribute to poet's intended purpose
3. Offer critical suggestions about how poet can accomplish purpose via revision
D. Create original poetry
1. Formal poetry
2. Free verse
E. Understand the basic elements of short fiction
1. Form
a. Flash fiction
b. Short story
2. Content
a. Character
b. Conflict
c. Dialogue
d. Setting
e. Tone
F. Analyze published short fiction
1. Identify significant elements
2. Determine how these elements contribute to writer's purpose
G. Critique student short fiction
1. Identify significant elements
2. Determine how elements contribute to writer's intended purpose
3. Offer critical suggestions about how writer can accomplish intended purpose via revision
H. Create original short fiction
1. Flash fiction
2. Short story
I. Participate in workshop setting
1. Constructive discussion
2. Constructive written feedback
J. Apply suggestions in the revision of original writing
1. Local revision
2. Global revision
K. Self-analysis of work
1. Portfolio review of poetry
a. Strengths and weaknesses
b. Progress
2. Portfolio review of short fiction
a. Strengths and weakness
b. Progress
L. Distinguish diverse voices
1. Published writing
2. Academic community

Lab Content

Not applicable.

Special Facilities and/or Equipment

None

Method(s) of Evaluation

A. Participation in workshop discussion.
B. Production of written critiques of student work.
C. Ten analytical responses of at least one page each to assigned published writings.
D. In-class writing exercises.
E. Three to five poems.
F. One short story or several pieces of flash fiction for a total of six to eight pages.
G. Revision of original work.
H. Portfolio Review of at least two pages.
I. Quality of original work.

Method(s) of Instruction

Lecture, Discussion, Cooperative learning exercises, Oral presentations.

Representative Text(s) and Other Materials

Materials are to include one text from each of the two areas below:

A textbook that explains how to write poetry and short fiction. Suggested textbooks are:

Burroway, Janet. Imaginative Writing: The Elements of Craft. 4th ed. New York: Longman, 2014.

Knorr, Jeff and Tim Schell. Mooring Against the Tide: Writing Fiction and Poetry. 2nd ed. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2005.



An anthology that contains poetry and short fiction or two anthologies, each focusing on one of the genres. Suggested anthologies are:

Knorr, Jeff and Tim Schell. A Writer's Country: A Collection of Fiction and Poetry. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2001.

Oates, Joyce Carol. Telling Stories: An Anthology for Writers. New York: Norton, 1997.

Gwyn, R S. Poetry: A Pocket Anthology. New York: Pearson, 2012.

 

Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing, and Outside of Class Assignments

A. Written analysis of published poetry and short fiction.

B. Composition of original poetry and short fiction.

 

Discipline(s)

English