Academic Catalog

ANTH 67C: CULTURES OF THE WORLD: BRITISH ISLES

Foothill College Course Outline of Record

Foothill College Course Outline of Record
Heading Value
Units: 4
Hours: 4 lecture per week (48 total per quarter)
Degree & Credit Status: Degree-Applicable Credit Course
Foothill GE: Non-GE
Transferable: CSU
Grade Type: Letter Grade (Request for Pass/No Pass)
Repeatability: Not Repeatable

Student Learning Outcomes

  • 1. Students will practice cultural relativism as it applies to the people of the British Isles.
  • 2. Students will learn how to critically analyze and interpret historic and prehistoric data from the British Isles.
  • 3. Students will apply anthropological principles for solving human problems on the local, regional and world scales.

Description

This course is part of a series to explore the diverse cultural heritage of the world using an anthropological perspective. In this case students cover the British Isles starting with the archaeological and historical past. Using anthropological methodology students explore the diversity within each culture, and then analyze the relationships within a worldwide context. As well, students are expected to synthesize the dynamics of power relationships within the culture in ancient and modern contexts by evaluating politics, economics, religion, and social development in the culture area. The course is designed to work with students either on an international program or intending to participate in a program of study on the British Isles.

Course Objectives

The student will be able to:
A. Describe archaeological and historical past of the British Isles.
B. Explain general patterns of anthropological thought in the British Isles.
C. Debate different theoretical and methodological frameworks used in the specific culture area on the British Isles.
D. Describe the cultural diversity within culture area and then analyze the relationships within a worldwide context.
E. Synthesize the dynamics of power relationships within the culture in ancient and modern contexts.
F. Evaluate politics, economics, religion, and social development in the culture area in the ancient and modern contexts.
G. Understand the relationship between research design and data acquisition.
H. Synthesize data acquired in the field.
I. Justify results and critically assess the project of study.

Course Content

A. Describe archaeological and historical past of the British Isles
1. Neolithic
2. Bronze Age
3. Iron Age
4. Medieval Period
5. Early Modern Period
6. Modern Period
B. Explain general patterns of anthropological thought in the British Isles
1. Contrast New World and Old World academic frameworks
2. Museum based approaches
3. British-style academic approaches from the 1800s to present which combine historical text analysis
4. American academic approaches using anthropology from the 1950s to present
C. Debate different methodological and theoretical frameworks used in the specific culture area on the British Isles
1. Research designs implemented anthropologists working in the culture area
a. Antiquarian approaches
b. Traditional cultural historical approaches
c. Scientifically based approaches
2. Theoretical approaches
a. Antiquarian approaches
b. Traditional cultural historical approaches
c. Scientifically based approaches
d. Post-modern approaches
D. Describe the cultural diversity within culture area and then analyze the relationships within a worldwide context
1. Linguistic diversity
2. Religious diversity
3. Economic diversity, including class based institutions
4. Political groupings
E. Synthesize the dynamics of power relationships within the culture in ancient and modern contexts
1. Aristocracy
2. Peasants and serfs
3. Land-holders
4. Religious institutions
5. Militaristic power
6. Political power in the modern era
F. Evaluate politics, economics, religion, and social development in the culture area in the ancient and modern contexts
1. Origins of political dynamics from ancient to modern
2. Rise of governmental institutions
3. Growth of empire and resistance to colonization
4. Church reformations
5. Manorial systems
6. Economic shifts from prehistory to history
G. Understand the relationship between research design and data acquisition
1. Research design in anthropology
a. Background historical context
b. Reconnaissance
c. Generating hypotheses
d. Field research and data acquisition testing hypotheses
e. Data analysis
f. Evaluation and synthesis
g. Publication
2. Data acquisition in anthropology
a. Field recording methods
b. Methods of survey in ethnography and archaeology
c. Note taking in anthropology and archaeology
H. Synthesize data acquired in the field
I. Justify results and critically assess projects of study

Lab Content

Not applicable.

Special Facilities and/or Equipment

A. When taught via Foothill Global Access, on-going access to computer with email software and hardware; email address.

Method(s) of Evaluation

A. Oral presentations on culture area
B. Cooperative group assignments designed to initiate field work
C. Final field notes and summary report
D. Final exam

Method(s) of Instruction

A. Lecture and classroom discussion on major topics.
B. Cultural contact component, which includes intercultural experience, interaction, and assessment of methods.
C. Write-up and analysis demonstrating original work and critical thinking.
D. Group presentations of major projects followed by in-class discussion and evaluation.

Representative Text(s) and Other Materials

Huscroft, Richard. The Norman Conquest: A New Introduction. Pearson, 2009.

Laing, Lloyd Robert. The Archaeology of Celtic Britain and Ireland: C.AD 400-1200. Cambridge University Press, 2006.

Berry, Terry. The Archaeology of Medieval Ireland. Routledge, 1988.



NOTE: Although these texts are older than the suggested "5 years or newer" standard, they remain seminal texts in this area of study.

 

Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing, and Outside of Class Assignments

Examples of college level assignments include:

A. Cultural survey and critical analysis of data for presentation.

B. Final essay critiquing the research experience.

C. Required textbooks covering the region both past and present.

 

Discipline(s)

Anthropology