Academic Catalog

ENGL 110: INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE WRITING

Foothill College Course Outline of Record

Foothill College Course Outline of Record
Heading Value
Units: 5
Hours: 5 lecture per week (60 total per quarter)
Prerequisite: Eligibility based on assessment or successful completion of ENGL 209.
Advisory: Not open to students with credit in ENGL 108.
Degree & Credit Status: Degree-Applicable Credit Course
Foothill GE: Non-GE
Transferable: None
Grade Type: Letter Grade (Request for Pass/No Pass)
Repeatability: Not Repeatable

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Articulate clear, arguable main ideas at the essay level (thesis/controlling idea) and paragraph level (topic sentence).
  • Develop focused, evidence-based paragraphs that support the thesis/controlling idea and topic sentence using direct quotes from the text and/or paraphrasing.
  • Develop structured essays that demonstrate overall unity and coherence.
  • Demonstrate critical reading in a formal writing assignment that includes summary and/or synthesis.

Description

Intended for students requiring explicit instruction and practice in writing expository essays, emphasizing clear sentence structure and logical development. Assignments include summary and synthesis of texts, critical analysis, as well as personal writing. Instruction includes rules of and practice on punctuation skills. Lecture, discussion, collaborative, and individualized instruction.

Course Objectives

The student will be able to:
A. Write short essays which include
1. a clear, controlling, arguable thesis.
2. opinions and conclusions supported by effective use of examples, evidence, and reasoning.
3. ideas organized into a logical sequence so that the central idea of the essay is developed to a logical conclusion.
B. Respond appropriately to a given writing task, meeting all requirements.
C. Demonstrate ability to summarize text, along with ability to interpret, analyze, and/or critique the ideas of the summary.
D. Demonstrate ability to synthesize ideas from two or more texts, along with interpretation, analysis, and/or critique.
E. Present original ideas as related to, but clearly distinguished from, the ideas of others.
F. Demonstrate fluency: write in-class essays of 1-2 pages; write out-of-class essays of 3-5 pages.
G. Demonstrate proper use of basic punctuation and an understanding of how punctuation creates sentence boundaries.
H. Revise and restructure so ideas are clearly organized and adequately supported.
I. Proofread for errors in language and mechanics.
J. Demonstrate awareness of pre-defined audience and writing assignment.
K. Distinguish between voices which reflect a diversity of cultural and social milieus.

Course Content

A. Write short essays which include:
1. Clear controlling idea
a. Arguable thesis
b. Write to the task assigned
2. Opinions and conclusions supported by effective use of examples, evidence, and reasoning
a. Variety in detail: examples, facts/research, observation/interview, logical reasoning, narratives
b. Succinct and relevant to main idea
c. Text-based references (in at least three of four essay assignments)
d. Paraphrases and direct quotes, documented/cited appropriately
3. Ideas organized into a logical sequence so that the central idea of the essay is developed to a logical conclusion
a. Beginning, middle, end sections where appropriate to assignment
b. Logical development of sections and points within sections
c. Transitional devices which reflect both unity to thesis and coherence between ideas
B. Respond appropriately to a given writing task, meeting all requirements
1. Identify components of assignment
2. Locate and generate appropriate material
C. Demonstrate ability to summarize text, along with ability to interpret, analyze, and/or critique the ideas of the summary
D. Demonstrate ability to synthesize ideas from two or more texts, along with interpretation, analysis, and/or critique
E. Present original ideas as related to, but clearly distinguished from, the ideas of others
1. Use MLA parenthetical documentation
2. Create Works Cited page if possible for sources used
F. Develop fluency: write in-class essays of 1-2 pages; write out-of-class essays of 3-5 pages
G. Demonstrate proper use of basic punctuation and an understanding of how punctuation creates sentence boundaries
1. Required rules
a. Comma
b. Quotation marks
c. Apostrophe
2. Optional rules
a. Semi-colon
b. Colon
H. Revise and restructure so ideas are clearly organized and adequately supported
1. Expansions and deletions
2. Restructuring according to stated goals/objectives of assignment
I. Proofread for errors in language and mechanics to the degree that the nature and frequency of errors does not become distracting
1. Sentence errors (fragments, run-ons)
2. Mechanics (punctuation, spelling)
3. Language and usage
4. Sentence variety
J. Demonstrate awareness of pre-defined audience and writing assignment
1. Select language and include information related to audience awareness
2. Word choice/diction
3. Voice
4. Background information; context clues; appositives
K. Distinguish between voices which reflect a diversity of cultural and social milieus
1. Sources
2. Academic community

Lab Content

Not applicable.

Special Facilities and/or Equipment

A. When taught in classroom, none.
B. When taught in computer lab with software programs (computer-assisted instruction, e.g., Academic Systems), access to computer and software.

Method(s) of Evaluation

A. Minimum of two in-class writing exams that require a response to text, e.g., summarizing, synthesizing, and/or critique.
B. At least three of four out-of-class essay assignments that require text-based sources (voices of others).
C. Assessment of punctuation skills.

Revisions may be allowed for at least two papers.

Method(s) of Instruction

Methods of instruction may include:
A. Attending lectures
B. Participating in whole class discussion
C. Participating in small group collaborative discussions and projects
D. Practicing strategies for informal and formal writing

Representative Text(s) and Other Materials

Materials are to include the three areas below, using one or more texts/selections or software programs:

A. Textbook/workbook/software that explains how to write a variety of essay structures and that offers a variety of practice exercises in formats emphasizing writing as a process (include prewriting, writing, and revision). Suggested texts include:

1. Miller, G. The Prentice Hall Reader. 11th ed. New York: Prentice Hall, 2015.

2. Rosa, A. Models for Writers: Short Essays for Composition. 12th ed. New York: McGraw Hill, 2015.

B. Skills book/software that allows practice in various elements of grammar and sentence structure. Suggested texts include:

1. English Department, San Francisco State University. Fog City Fundamentals. 3rd ed. Burgess International Group, 1998.

2. Graff, G. They Say I Say. 3rd ed. New York: WW Norton, 2014.

3. Altman, Pam, et al. Sentence Combining Workbook. 4th ed. Cengage, 2014.

C. Reader that provides topical subject matter in a variety of styles/formats and diverse voices. Suggested texts include:

1. Ackley, K. Perspectives on Contemporary Culture. 8th ed. Wadsworth Publishing, 2018.

2. Atwan, R. America Now. 11th ed. Bedford/St. Martin's, 2015.

3. Graff, G. They Say I Say, with readings. 3rd ed. New York: WW Norton, 2015.

 

Types and/or Examples of Required Reading, Writing, and Outside of Class Assignments

Reading, writing, and outside-of-class assignments may include:

A. Out-of-class reading assignments

B. In-class and out-of-class writing assignments, including summary, synthesis, and/or evaluation skills

C. Revision assignments

D. Punctuation quizzes/tests

 

Discipline(s)

English